Chapter Meetings and Peer Support

Virginia C.O.P.S. meets on a monthly basis to support its membership.  Meetings include peer support, social events and business meetings.  Please contact a board member for more information.

 

National Police Week

Each year our nation loses between 140-160 law enforcement officers in the line of duty.  National Police Week (NPW) held May 11 – 17 each year in Washington, D.C. honors the service and sacrifice of U.S. law enforcement officers.  On May 11 and 12, surviving families and co-workers begin arriving in Washington, D.C. for the week-long events.

The first major event is the Candlelight Vigil hosted by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) on May 13.  The service begins at 8:00 p.m. with the newly engraved names being read.

 

Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.) hosts the National Police Survivors’ Conference on May 14 and May 16 at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, the host hotel.  The conference includes breakfast, lunch, guest speakers, debriefing sessions and a Kids/Teens program for the surviving children and siblings of the fallen officer.  On May 16 the conference closes with a Picnic on the Patio night where dinner is provided with games, music and more.  This allows survivors to relax and be with each other after a stressful week.

 

The Fraternal Order of Police and Auxiliary hosts the National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service on the west front lawn of the U.S. Capitol on May 15.  The surviving family members will have an opportunity to place a flower in a wreath honoring their fallen officer.  The service begins at 11:00 a.m. and will last about 2 hours.

 

History of National Police Week

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed Public Law 87-726 designating May 15 as Peace Officers' Memorial Day, and the week in which May 15 falls as National Police Week.  The law was amended by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322, signed by President Bill Clinton, directing that the flag of the United States be displayed at half-staff on all government buildings on May 15 each year.  While the actual dates change from year to year, National Police Week is always the calendar week, beginning on Sunday, which includes May 15.

 

Learn more about National Police Week.

 

National Police Survivors' Conference

Each May, during the activities that comprise National Police Week, C.O.P.S. hosts the annual National Police Survivors’ Conference.  Law enforcement survivors, co-workers and agencies from across the nation gather to meet others who understand how they feel, attend seminar sessions specifically designed for their needs, and hear presentations delivering inspirational messages on hope and survival.

 

The C.O.P.S. National Police Survivors’ Conference will allow survivors to realize they are not alone in their grief and give them the tools and hope to start rebuilding their shattered lives.

 

Sample of Sessions include:

• Dealing With Family and Friends that Don’t Get It

• Getting “Unstuck” From Trauma: Eye Movement, Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

• It Isn’t Over When It’s Over

• Keeping Faith During Traumatic Times

• Law Enforcement Death Is Always So Traumatic - Why?

• Life Is Like A Dance - Sometimes You Lead and Sometimes You Follow

• Mending While Blending

• My Emotions - Is This Normal?

• Preparing for Trial and the Aftermath

• Putting my Marriage Back Together After a Line-of-Duty Death

• Reaching Out to the Newly Bereaved

• Resiliency - How to Survive in the Face of Trauma

• Running a Healthy Chapter - Back to Basics

• Single Parenting - When It’s Not By Choice

• Survivor Guilt - Why Do I Feel So Guilty?

• Teenagers and the Grief Process - Panel Discussion

 

Learn more about National Police Week and Survivor’s Conference.

 

C.O.P.S. Kids/Teen Program at National Police Week

At National Police Week each May, children and siblings who have lost a parent or sibling to a line-of-duty death can participate in special activities.  Fallen officers’ children/step-children and siblings, in kindergarten through 12th grade, will have the opportunity to attend grief counseling sessions, as well as age-appropriate fun and social activities.  The program is held off-site at local and federal law enforcement academies.

 

For many kids, this is the first time they have made contact with peers - other kids who have gone through the same thing they have - the loss of a loved one to line-of-duty death.  A dedicated staff of professionals and volunteers assess the children's emotional well-being, listen and guide them through any issues they wish to talk about, while participating in a variety of fun activities.  Results of the emotional assessments are provided to parents after National Police Week so that, if needed, additional counseling can be obtained at home.

Virginia C.O.P.S.

 

P.O. Box 1595

Ashland, VA  23005

 

501(c)(3) non-profit organization

DISCLOSURE: If you would like to help our organization by doing a fundraiser using our name, acronym, trademark or logo, or if you are with another organization and want to reference your support of Virginia C.O.P.S. in your organization’s materials, please keep the following in mind: Our organization has developed a proprietary interest in its name, acronym, trademark, use of materials and logo, and all uses of same require our prior approval.  Please submit your proposals or requests in writing to our office.  Copyright © 2020 Virginia Concerns of Police Survivors, Inc.

 

 

©2020 VIRGINIA CONCERNS OF POLICE SURVIVORS.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, WORLDWIDE.

Chapter Meetings and Peer Support

Virginia C.O.P.S. meets on a monthly basis to support its membership.  Meetings include peer support, social events and business meetings.  Please contact a board member for more information.

 

National Police Week

Each year our nation loses between 140-160 law enforcement officers in the line of duty.  National Police Week (NPW) held May 11 – 17 each year in Washington, D.C. honors the service and sacrifice of U.S. law enforcement officers.  On May 11 and 12, surviving families and co-workers begin arriving in Washington, D.C. for the week-long events.

The first major event is the Candlelight Vigil hosted by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) on May 13.  The service begins at 8:00 p.m. with the newly engraved names being read.

 

Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.) hosts the National Police Survivors’ Conference on May 14 and May 16 at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, the host hotel.  The conference includes breakfast, lunch, guest speakers, debriefing sessions and a Kids/Teens program for the surviving children and siblings of the fallen officer.  On May 16 the conference closes with a Picnic on the Patio night where dinner is provided with games, music and more.  This allows survivors to relax and be with each other after a stressful week.

 

The Fraternal Order of Police and Auxiliary hosts the National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service on the west front lawn of the U.S. Capitol on May 15.  The surviving family members will have an opportunity to place a flower in a wreath honoring their fallen officer.  The service begins at 11:00 a.m. and will last about 2 hours.

 

History of National Police Week

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed Public Law 87-726 designating May 15 as Peace Officers' Memorial Day, and the week in which May 15 falls as National Police Week.  The law was amended by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322, signed by President Bill Clinton, directing that the flag of the United States be displayed at half-staff on all government buildings on May 15 each year.  While the actual dates change from year to year, National Police Week is always the calendar week, beginning on Sunday, which includes May 15.

 

National Police Week Schedule.

 

National Police Survivors' Conference

Each May, during the activities that comprise National Police Week, C.O.P.S. hosts the annual National Police Survivors’ Conference.  Law enforcement survivors, co-workers and agencies from across the nation gather to meet others who understand how they feel, attend seminar sessions specifically designed for their needs, and hear presentations delivering inspirational messages on hope and survival.

 

The C.O.P.S. National Police Survivors’ Conference will allow survivors to realize they are not alone in their grief and give them the tools and hope to start rebuilding their shattered lives.

 

Sample of Sessions include:

• Dealing With Family and Friends that Don’t Get It

• Getting “Unstuck” From Trauma: Eye Movement, Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

• It Isn’t Over When It’s Over

• Keeping Faith During Traumatic Times

• Law Enforcement Death Is Always So Traumatic - Why?

• Life Is Like A Dance - Sometimes You Lead and Sometimes You Follow

• Mending While Blending

• My Emotions - Is This Normal?

• Preparing for Trial and the Aftermath

• Putting my Marriage Back Together After a Line-of-Duty Death

• Reaching Out to the Newly Bereaved

• Resiliency - How to Survive in the Face of Trauma

• Running a Healthy Chapter - Back to Basics

• Single Parenting - When It’s Not By Choice

• Survivor Guilt - Why Do I Feel So Guilty?

• Teenagers and the Grief Process - Panel Discussion

 

National Police Week and Survivor’s Conference Registration.

 

C.O.P.S. Kids/Teen Program at National Police Week

 

At National Police Week each May, children and siblings who have lost a parent or sibling to a line-of-duty death can participate in special activities.  Fallen officers’ children/step-children and siblings, in kindergarten through 12th grade, will have the opportunity to attend grief counseling sessions, as well as age-appropriate fun and social activities.  The program is held off-site at local and federal law enforcement academies.

 

For many kids, this is the first time they have made contact with peers - other kids who have gone through the same thing they have - the loss of a loved one to line-of-duty death.  A dedicated staff of professionals and volunteers assess the children's emotional well-being, listen and guide them through any issues they wish to talk about, while participating in a variety of fun activities.  Results of the emotional assessments are provided to parents after National Police Week so that, if needed, additional counseling can be obtained at home.